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Neo-Victorian Cannibalism [electronic resource] :A Theory of Contemporary Adaptations /

By: Ho, Tammy Lai-Ming [author.].
Contributor(s): SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing : Imprint: Palgrave Pivot, 2019.Description: VIII, 150 p. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783030025595.Subject(s): Literature, Modern-20th century | Comparative literature | Literature, Modern-19th century | Gothic fiction (Literary genre) | Contemporary Literature | Comparative Literature | Nineteenth-Century Literature | Gothic FictionOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Chapter One: Introduction: Neo-Victorian Cannibalism -- Chapter Two: Contesting (Post-)colonialism: Jane Eyre, Wide Sargasso Sea and Three Neo-Victorian Rejoinders -- Chapter Three: Dickens the Cannibal Cannibalised -- Chapter Four: Stoker and Neo-Draculas -- Chapter Five: Coda: Victorian Memes. .
In: Springer eBooksSummary: This Pivot examines a body of contemporary neo-Victorian novels whose uneasy relationship with the past can be theorised in terms of aggressive eating, including cannibalism. Not only is the imagery of eating repeatedly used by critics to comprehend neo-Victorian literature, the theme of cannibalism itself also appears overtly or implicitly in a number of the novels and their Victorian prototypes, thereby mirroring the cannibalistic relationship between the contemporary and the Victorian. Tammy Lai-Ming Ho argues that aggressive eating or cannibalism can be seen as a pathological and defining characteristic of neo-Victorian fiction, demonstrating how cannibalism provides a framework for understanding the genre’s origin, its conflicted, ambivalent and violent relationship with its Victorian predecessors and the grotesque and gothic effects that it generates in its fiction.
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Chapter One: Introduction: Neo-Victorian Cannibalism -- Chapter Two: Contesting (Post-)colonialism: Jane Eyre, Wide Sargasso Sea and Three Neo-Victorian Rejoinders -- Chapter Three: Dickens the Cannibal Cannibalised -- Chapter Four: Stoker and Neo-Draculas -- Chapter Five: Coda: Victorian Memes. .

This Pivot examines a body of contemporary neo-Victorian novels whose uneasy relationship with the past can be theorised in terms of aggressive eating, including cannibalism. Not only is the imagery of eating repeatedly used by critics to comprehend neo-Victorian literature, the theme of cannibalism itself also appears overtly or implicitly in a number of the novels and their Victorian prototypes, thereby mirroring the cannibalistic relationship between the contemporary and the Victorian. Tammy Lai-Ming Ho argues that aggressive eating or cannibalism can be seen as a pathological and defining characteristic of neo-Victorian fiction, demonstrating how cannibalism provides a framework for understanding the genre’s origin, its conflicted, ambivalent and violent relationship with its Victorian predecessors and the grotesque and gothic effects that it generates in its fiction.

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