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X86 assembly language and C fundamentals

By: Cavanagh, Joseph.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boca Raton, FL : CRC Press, ©2013Description: xxiv, 789 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.ISBN: 9781466568242.Subject(s): X86 assembly language (Computer program language) | C (Computer program language) | COMPUTERS / Computer Engineering | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Electrical | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Electronics / Circuits / GeneralSummary: "PREFACE Although assembly language is not as prevalent as a high-level language, such as C or an object-oriented language like C++, it is the predominant language used in embedded microprocessors. A course in a high-level language, such as C usually precedes a course in assembly language. Assembly language programming requires a knowledge of number representations, such as fixed-point, decimal, and floating-point; also digital logic, registers, and stacks. In order to thoroughly understand assembly language, it is necessary to be familiar with the architecture of the computer on which the language is being used. For the X86 assembly language, this implies the Intel and Intel-like microprocessors. Programs written in assembly language are usually faster and more compact than programs written in a high-level language and provide greater control over the program application. Assembly language is machine dependent; that is, it is used only with a specific type of processor. A high-level language, however, is usually machine independent; that is, it can be used with any processor. Assembly language programs use an assembler to convert the assembly language code to the machine language of 1s and 0s. This is in contrast to high-level languages which use compilers to accomplish the transformation. Assembly languages consist of mnemonic codes, which are similar to English words, making the program easy to read. For example, the MOV instruction moves data from a source location to a destination location; the XCHG instruction exchanges the contents of a source location and a destination location; and the logical AND instruction performs the bitwise AND operation of two operands"--
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Computer Science and Engineering REF 005.136 CAV-X (Browse shelf) Not For Loan 007800
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REF 005.133 STR-C The C++ programming language REF 005.133 STR-C The C++ programming language REF 005.133 VEN-M Mastering C++ REF 005.136 CAV-X X86 assembly language and C fundamentals REF 005.14 BEN-P Principles of the spin model checker REF 005.14 BUT-D Debug it! : REF 005.14 DES-S Software testing :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"PREFACE Although assembly language is not as prevalent as a high-level language, such as C or an object-oriented language like C++, it is the predominant language used in embedded microprocessors. A course in a high-level language, such as C usually precedes a course in assembly language. Assembly language programming requires a knowledge of number representations, such as fixed-point, decimal, and floating-point; also digital logic, registers, and stacks. In order to thoroughly understand assembly language, it is necessary to be familiar with the architecture of the computer on which the language is being used. For the X86 assembly language, this implies the Intel and Intel-like microprocessors. Programs written in assembly language are usually faster and more compact than programs written in a high-level language and provide greater control over the program application. Assembly language is machine dependent; that is, it is used only with a specific type of processor. A high-level language, however, is usually machine independent; that is, it can be used with any processor. Assembly language programs use an assembler to convert the assembly language code to the machine language of 1s and 0s. This is in contrast to high-level languages which use compilers to accomplish the transformation. Assembly languages consist of mnemonic codes, which are similar to English words, making the program easy to read. For example, the MOV instruction moves data from a source location to a destination location; the XCHG instruction exchanges the contents of a source location and a destination location; and the logical AND instruction performs the bitwise AND operation of two operands"--

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