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Autonomic Networking [electronic resource] :First International IFIP TC6 Conference, AN 2006, Paris, France, September 27-29, 2006. Proceedings /

Contributor(s): Gaïti, Dominique [editor.] | Pujolle, Guy [editor.] | Al-Shaer, Ehab [editor.] | Calvert, Ken [editor.] | Dobson, Simon [editor.] | Leduc, Guy [editor.] | Martikainen, Olli [editor.] | SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Lecture Notes in Computer Science: 4195Publisher: Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2006.Description: IX, 316 p. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783540458937.Subject(s): Computer science | Computer communication systems | Information storage and retrieval | Electrical engineering | Computer Science | Computer Communication Networks | Information Systems Applications (incl. Internet) | Information Storage and Retrieval | Communications Engineering, NetworksOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
AN’06 -- Towards Autonomic Networks -- A Cognitive Architecture for Personal Networks -- A Cross-Layer Architecture for Autonomic Communications -- Self-configuration of Network Devices with Configuration Logic -- Dynamic Decision Making for Candidate Access Point Selection -- A Multi Agent System Approach for Self Resource Regulation in IP Networks -- DoS Protection for a Pragmatic Multiservice Network Based on Programmable Networks -- Lessons for Autonomic Services from the Design of an Anonymous DoS Protection Overlay -- An Extensible and Flexible System for Network Anomaly Detection -- Design and Implementation of a Service Provisioning Platform Using Smart Cards -- Autonomous Agents for Self-managed MPLS DiffServ-TE Domain -- An Efficient Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation Algorithm for Quality of Service Networks -- Artificial Intelligence Techniques in the Dynamic Negotiation of QoS: A User Interface for the Internet New Generation -- An Approach to Integrated Semantic Service Discovery -- Policy-Based Management and Context Modelling Contributions for Supporting Services in Autonomic Systems -- Implicit Context-Sensitive Mobile Computing Using Semantic Policies -- GXLA a Language for the Specification of Service Level Agreements -- A Service Management Approach for Self-healing Wireless Sensor Networks -- Integration of Mobile IPv6 into Mobile Ad-Hoc Network Systems -- AToM: Atomic Topology Management of Wireless Sensor Networks -- An Architecture for Autonomic Management of Ambient Networks -- Autonomic Communications: Exploiting Advanced and Game Theoretical Techniques for RAT Selection and Protocol Reconfiguration -- Managing Policies for Dynamic Spectrum Access -- An Intermediate Framework for Unifying and Automating Mobile Communication Systems.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: The autonomic communication paradigm has been defined mainly through the Autonomic Communications Forum (ACF) and particularly as follows: Autonomic communication is centered on selfware – an innovative approach to perform known and emerging tasks of a network control plane, both end-to-end and middle box communication-based. Selfware assures the capacity to evolve; however, it requires generic network instrumentation. Selfware principles and technologies borrow largely from well-established research on distributed systems, fault tolerance among others, from emerging research on non-conventional networking (multihop ad hoc, sensor, peer-to-peer, group communication, etc. ), and from similar initiatives, such as Autonomic Computing of IBM, Cognitive Network of DARPA, Harmonious Computing of Hitachi, Resonant Networking of NTT, etc. A visionary network would be able to (a) configure and re-configure itself, (b) identify its operational state and take actions to drive itself to a desired stable state and finally (c) organize the allocation and distribution of its resources. To build such a network, it is necessary to go beyond the improvement of techniques and algorithms by using a new concept, the knowledge plane. The knowledge plane is able to collect information available in the network to provide other elements of the network with services and advice and make the network perform what it is supposed to. There are many objectives to the configuration and reconfiguration of the network, from the optimization of resources to the use of best available techniques in order to offer the most appropriate service, best adapted to the t- minal capabilities.
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AN’06 -- Towards Autonomic Networks -- A Cognitive Architecture for Personal Networks -- A Cross-Layer Architecture for Autonomic Communications -- Self-configuration of Network Devices with Configuration Logic -- Dynamic Decision Making for Candidate Access Point Selection -- A Multi Agent System Approach for Self Resource Regulation in IP Networks -- DoS Protection for a Pragmatic Multiservice Network Based on Programmable Networks -- Lessons for Autonomic Services from the Design of an Anonymous DoS Protection Overlay -- An Extensible and Flexible System for Network Anomaly Detection -- Design and Implementation of a Service Provisioning Platform Using Smart Cards -- Autonomous Agents for Self-managed MPLS DiffServ-TE Domain -- An Efficient Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation Algorithm for Quality of Service Networks -- Artificial Intelligence Techniques in the Dynamic Negotiation of QoS: A User Interface for the Internet New Generation -- An Approach to Integrated Semantic Service Discovery -- Policy-Based Management and Context Modelling Contributions for Supporting Services in Autonomic Systems -- Implicit Context-Sensitive Mobile Computing Using Semantic Policies -- GXLA a Language for the Specification of Service Level Agreements -- A Service Management Approach for Self-healing Wireless Sensor Networks -- Integration of Mobile IPv6 into Mobile Ad-Hoc Network Systems -- AToM: Atomic Topology Management of Wireless Sensor Networks -- An Architecture for Autonomic Management of Ambient Networks -- Autonomic Communications: Exploiting Advanced and Game Theoretical Techniques for RAT Selection and Protocol Reconfiguration -- Managing Policies for Dynamic Spectrum Access -- An Intermediate Framework for Unifying and Automating Mobile Communication Systems.

The autonomic communication paradigm has been defined mainly through the Autonomic Communications Forum (ACF) and particularly as follows: Autonomic communication is centered on selfware – an innovative approach to perform known and emerging tasks of a network control plane, both end-to-end and middle box communication-based. Selfware assures the capacity to evolve; however, it requires generic network instrumentation. Selfware principles and technologies borrow largely from well-established research on distributed systems, fault tolerance among others, from emerging research on non-conventional networking (multihop ad hoc, sensor, peer-to-peer, group communication, etc. ), and from similar initiatives, such as Autonomic Computing of IBM, Cognitive Network of DARPA, Harmonious Computing of Hitachi, Resonant Networking of NTT, etc. A visionary network would be able to (a) configure and re-configure itself, (b) identify its operational state and take actions to drive itself to a desired stable state and finally (c) organize the allocation and distribution of its resources. To build such a network, it is necessary to go beyond the improvement of techniques and algorithms by using a new concept, the knowledge plane. The knowledge plane is able to collect information available in the network to provide other elements of the network with services and advice and make the network perform what it is supposed to. There are many objectives to the configuration and reconfiguration of the network, from the optimization of resources to the use of best available techniques in order to offer the most appropriate service, best adapted to the t- minal capabilities.

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