FEEDBACK Smiley face
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Peer-to-Peer Systems [electronic resource] :First InternationalWorkshop, IPTPS 2002 Cambridge, MA, USA, March 7–8, 2002 Revised Papers /

Contributor(s): Druschel, Peter [editor.] | Kaashoek, Frans [editor.] | Rowstron, Antony [editor.] | SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Lecture Notes in Computer Science: 2429Publisher: Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2002.Description: X, 346 p. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783540457480.Subject(s): Computer science | Computer communication systems | Operating systems (Computers) | Data structures (Computer science) | Algorithms | Electrical engineering | Computer Science | Computer Communication Networks | Information Systems Applications (incl. Internet) | Operating Systems | Algorithm Analysis and Problem Complexity | Data Structures | Communications Engineering, NetworksOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Workshop Report for IPTPS’02 1st International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems 7–8 March 2002 — MIT Faculty Club, Cambridge, MA, USA -- Workshop Report for IPTPS’02 1st International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems 7–8 March 2002 — MIT Faculty Club, Cambridge, MA, USA -- Structure Overlay Routing Protocols: State of the Art and Future Directions -- Observations on the Dynamic Evolution of Peer-to-Peer Networks -- Brocade: Landmark Routing on Overlay Networks -- Routing Algorithms for DHTs: Some Open Questions -- Kademlia: A Peer-to-Peer Information System Based on the XOR Metric -- Efficient Peer-to-Peer Lookup Based on a Distributed Trie -- Self-Organizing Subsets: From Each According to His Abilities, to Each According to His Needs -- Deployed Peer-to-Peer Systems -- Mapping the Gnutella Network: Macroscopic Properties of Large-Scale Peer-to-Peer Systems -- Can Heterogeneity Make Gnutella Scalable? -- Experiences Deploying a Large-Scale Emergent Network -- Anonymous Overlays -- Anonymizing Censorship Resistant Systems -- Introducing Tarzan, a Peer-to-Peer Anonymizing Network Layer -- Applications -- Mnemosyne: Peer-to-Peer Steganographic Storage -- ConChord: Cooperative SDSI Certificate Storage and Name Resolution -- Serving DNS Using a Peer-to-Peer Lookup Service -- Network Measurement as a Cooperative Enterprise -- The Case for Cooperative Networking* -- Internet Indirection Infrastructure -- Peer-to-Peer Caching Schemes to Address Flash Crowds -- Evaluation -- Exploring the Design Space of Distributed and Peer-to-Peer Systems: Comparing the Web, TRIAD, and Chord/CFS -- Are Virtualized Overlay Networks Too Much of a Good Thing? -- Searching and Indexing -- Locating Data in (Small-World?) Peer-to-Peer Scientific Collaborations -- Complex Queries in DHT-based Peer-to-Peer Networks -- The Sybil Attack -- Security Considerations for Peer-to-Peer Distributed Hash Tables -- Dynamically Fault-Tolerant Content Addressable Networks -- Data Management -- Scalable Management and Data Mining Using Astrolabe* -- Atomic Data Access in Distributed Hash Tables -- Dynamic Replica Placement for Scalable Content Delivery -- Peer-to-Peer Resource Trading in a Reliable Distributed System -- Erasure Coding Vs. Replication: A Quantitative Comparison.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: Peer-to-peer has emerged as a promising new paradigm for large-scale distributed computing. The International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems (IPTPS) aimed to provide a forum for researchers active in peer-to-peer computing to discuss the state of the art and to identify key research challenges. The goal of the workshop was to examine peer-to-peer technologies, appli- tions, and systems, and also to identify key research issues and challenges that lie ahead. In the context of this workshop, peer-to-peer systems were characterized as being decentralized, self-organizing distributed systems, in which all or most communication is symmetric. The program of the workshop was a combination of invited talks, pres- tations of position papers, and discussions covering novel peer-to-peer appli- tions and systems, peer-to-peer infrastructure, security in peer-to-peer systems, anonymity and anti-censorship, performance of peer-to-peer systems, and wo- load characterization for peer-to-peer systems. To ensure a productive workshop environment, attendance was limited to 55 participants. Each potential participant was asked to submit a position paper of 5 pages that exposed a new problem, advocated a speci?c solution, or reported on actual experience. We received 99 submissions and were able to accept 31. Participants were invited based on the originality, technical merit, and topical relevance of their submissions, as well as the likelihood that the ideas expressed in their submissions would lead to insightful technical discussions at the workshop.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Add tag(s)
Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
No physical items for this record

Workshop Report for IPTPS’02 1st International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems 7–8 March 2002 — MIT Faculty Club, Cambridge, MA, USA -- Workshop Report for IPTPS’02 1st International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems 7–8 March 2002 — MIT Faculty Club, Cambridge, MA, USA -- Structure Overlay Routing Protocols: State of the Art and Future Directions -- Observations on the Dynamic Evolution of Peer-to-Peer Networks -- Brocade: Landmark Routing on Overlay Networks -- Routing Algorithms for DHTs: Some Open Questions -- Kademlia: A Peer-to-Peer Information System Based on the XOR Metric -- Efficient Peer-to-Peer Lookup Based on a Distributed Trie -- Self-Organizing Subsets: From Each According to His Abilities, to Each According to His Needs -- Deployed Peer-to-Peer Systems -- Mapping the Gnutella Network: Macroscopic Properties of Large-Scale Peer-to-Peer Systems -- Can Heterogeneity Make Gnutella Scalable? -- Experiences Deploying a Large-Scale Emergent Network -- Anonymous Overlays -- Anonymizing Censorship Resistant Systems -- Introducing Tarzan, a Peer-to-Peer Anonymizing Network Layer -- Applications -- Mnemosyne: Peer-to-Peer Steganographic Storage -- ConChord: Cooperative SDSI Certificate Storage and Name Resolution -- Serving DNS Using a Peer-to-Peer Lookup Service -- Network Measurement as a Cooperative Enterprise -- The Case for Cooperative Networking* -- Internet Indirection Infrastructure -- Peer-to-Peer Caching Schemes to Address Flash Crowds -- Evaluation -- Exploring the Design Space of Distributed and Peer-to-Peer Systems: Comparing the Web, TRIAD, and Chord/CFS -- Are Virtualized Overlay Networks Too Much of a Good Thing? -- Searching and Indexing -- Locating Data in (Small-World?) Peer-to-Peer Scientific Collaborations -- Complex Queries in DHT-based Peer-to-Peer Networks -- The Sybil Attack -- Security Considerations for Peer-to-Peer Distributed Hash Tables -- Dynamically Fault-Tolerant Content Addressable Networks -- Data Management -- Scalable Management and Data Mining Using Astrolabe* -- Atomic Data Access in Distributed Hash Tables -- Dynamic Replica Placement for Scalable Content Delivery -- Peer-to-Peer Resource Trading in a Reliable Distributed System -- Erasure Coding Vs. Replication: A Quantitative Comparison.

Peer-to-peer has emerged as a promising new paradigm for large-scale distributed computing. The International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems (IPTPS) aimed to provide a forum for researchers active in peer-to-peer computing to discuss the state of the art and to identify key research challenges. The goal of the workshop was to examine peer-to-peer technologies, appli- tions, and systems, and also to identify key research issues and challenges that lie ahead. In the context of this workshop, peer-to-peer systems were characterized as being decentralized, self-organizing distributed systems, in which all or most communication is symmetric. The program of the workshop was a combination of invited talks, pres- tations of position papers, and discussions covering novel peer-to-peer appli- tions and systems, peer-to-peer infrastructure, security in peer-to-peer systems, anonymity and anti-censorship, performance of peer-to-peer systems, and wo- load characterization for peer-to-peer systems. To ensure a productive workshop environment, attendance was limited to 55 participants. Each potential participant was asked to submit a position paper of 5 pages that exposed a new problem, advocated a speci?c solution, or reported on actual experience. We received 99 submissions and were able to accept 31. Participants were invited based on the originality, technical merit, and topical relevance of their submissions, as well as the likelihood that the ideas expressed in their submissions would lead to insightful technical discussions at the workshop.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

© IIIT-Delhi, 2013 | Phone: +91-11-26907510| FAX +91-11-26907405 | E-mail: library@iiitd.ac.in